Tygpress is NOT Authorized to Reprint My Blog Content

This post is a follow up on my previous post about Tygpress (hosted by Digital Oceans). They continue to scrape my blog as well as others’ blogs. We have lost one blog (maybe two) because of this issue and that makes me very sad.

Fandango created a badge that he kindly allowed other bloggers to use. I am going to be using this badge on all my posts going forward.

Also, check out this post at Renard’s World. He wrote a thoughtful article about this issue with some excellent explanations and suggestions about how to further handle this issue.

I hope you are not affected by this issue, but if you are – know that you aren’t alone and that there is something you can do about it. As for me, I will continue with my posting and and my brand new badge while continuing to explore options to shut down this unethical website.

©️ iido 2019

Love Works – A Senryu

Two rough reddened hands

Wash plates, clothes, floors and faces

Work softened by love

The senryu is for Patrick’s Pic and A Word Challenge #195 – Work. And yes, those dishes are a real example of the work I do as a stay at home mom (don’t ask about the chunky, frothy bits – I don’t know what they are either).

Patrick’s words about the “beauty of the moment taking work out of the job” really resonated with me. Being a stay at home mom, I’ve sometimes have to work really hard to find these moments!

I know I have many poems here about mothering – some funny and some serious but all coming from a place of love. The work involved with being a parent really needs that love – not love as reimbursement from our children and partners, but love as a no strings attached gift to our children and partners. I think about that when I am on my 5th basket of laundry (we are a family of 6!) or loading the dishwasher for the third time in a day. I don’t love the chores/work but I love the people. And there are days when they show their love for me by pairing the socks.

©️ iido 2019

Parenting Haze – A Poem

The first 24 hours, a dream
Of downy softness anchoring
The haze from the drip, drip
Am I ready?

The first 3 months, a gauntlet
Of liquids leaking, not sleeping
A form of hazing
Will I survive?

The first year, a tornado
Of becoming a talker, walker
Hazardous trial and error
Am I doing it right?

The next 21 years, a crystal ball
Wanted to predict and protect
Hazy edges turn sharp
Cutting off my questions

The hazmat of parenting
When can I stop worrying?

This poem was written for Patrick’s Pic and A Word Challenge #179 – Haze. I am on a streak completing Patrick’s beautiful word and photo prompts. Last week was a “rush” post but I didn’t want to miss his prompt!

This week, I had a bit of fun with his word “haze”, repeating the “haz” in different forms in this poem. Gina at dVerse talked about a “hum” in our lives (check out Gina’s poem beautifully illustrating this) however my life right now (and for quite sometime) can be more described as having a “haze” not a hum. Maybe it the lack of sleep or the rush of our daily schedule, but this haze, this film, covers my view of the world. Sometimes it obscures parts I can’t or don’t want to see. Sometimes it colors conversations (like a sepia filter) and changes the meaning of those connections. Sometimes it is as thick as a pea soup fog that I must pull myself through. Sometimes it is words, phrases and ideas that overcome my mind until they can be captured in lines of verse. I don’t know if I’m friends with this haze but I’m thankful for its inspiration for this poem.

©️ iido 2019

Peaceful Goodbye – A Short Story

My eyes were parched, yet I kept them open, watching you as I did when you walked to the school bus. It seemed like such a long way for you to walk with your little legs. I told you not to look back, that looking back would make it harder, and I wanted us to have a “peaceful goodbye”. Peace was the September “virtue of the month” and it helped those first days when being apart wasn’t normal.

My throat closed up, as if I could cry, choking the words I wanted to call out – I love you! I’m proud of you! But you didn’t need to hear that – your humility and compassion allowed you to understand more than your 4 year old self should.

My heart slowed, a molasses drip, wondering what you were thinking as your tiny feet plodded on. Perseverance and courage might as well be etched on your retreating back. But the little wrinkles on your forehead would spell curiosity – we had that common. I wanted to help you, but you respectfully said you would go alone and that I should stay. I would have held you back, you honestly said. You knew I wouldn’t want that. Oh, how wise you had become!

My breath hitched and I was afraid – afraid you wouldn’t find the joy that I knew you deserved. But you didn’t look back and when you started to run – that’s when I knew:

You were going to where you truly belonged.

This short story is in response to Hélène Viallant’s “What do you see?” Picture prompt. There were so many ways to respond to this picture that Hélène posted – it could be scary or exciting or sad. It could have elements of science fiction or fantasy. Or a metaphor. My story is a little bit of all that. The back story could be that the world is coming to an end, the mother left behind to perish watching the sole survivor, her child, walking towards the unknown. Is it hopeful? Or ominous?

I also incorporated several virtues (or values) from Montessori education to fulfill Jamie Dedes’ Wednesday Writing Prompt request to “tell us about values gone awry”. My children attend a Montessori school and these virtues are lessons that are incorporated in the classroom and that I also try to utilize and exemplify at home. This whole child viewpoint of teaching is one of the reasons I love Montessori education.

While I’m not sure my story is one of values gone wrong, it does remind me of the saying “good guys finish last”. But do they really? If they believe their behavior, their sacrifice is for a noble cause, are they finishing last or being the first hero?

No Need to Wait – A Haibun

Raindrops on my window pane remember another time, another storm, another breath of waiting. It was still new and exciting back then. Now, it’s just worrisome as time goes faster and faster.

Waiting for that look

When you turn your head and wave

Not today – you’ve grown

Imelda at dVerse hosted Haibun Monday with the theme: Waiting. As a mom, I spend a lot of time waiting for my kids – to get ready in the morning, to get them from school, to do their chores; also waiting while they are at their numerous after school activities. I usually try to catch up on correspondence during those few minutes or use that time to type out thoughts for a poem. Sometimes, I just sit and listen to music or to the silence before the kids fill the space.

The picture above is of my older daughter doing a ropes course. See her, on the right, in the trees? Such a brave girl! I realize as they get older, they won’t need me to wait for them anymore. They might go with their friends or (gasp!) be able to drive themselves to/from school, activities. The nine months of waiting for them seemed to last forever and now the time is going too fast! Soon, I will no longer need to wait.

©️ iido 2018

To the Moon and Back – A Quintilla and Quintain

A Quintilla

To the moon and back, I promised

No matter if I’m demolished

My child, I will search high and low

I’ll follow wherever you go

No fear – for you, I can do this

A Quintain

I promised to the moon and back

My love brings me to this journey

I won’t come back ’til what I lack

Returns with me in a hurry

Dear child, there’s no need to worry

Hélène provides another beautiful picture prompt for “What do you see? Weekly Challenge”. The image reminded me of the children’s book, “Guess How Much I Love You” which had the phrase “to the moon and back” and these poems were birthed!

I also tried to incorporate the writing challenge from Grace at D’Verse Poets to try writing an English Quintain or a Spanish Quintilla (too late to add it to Mr. Linky). These two forms are similar – poems with five (5) lines each – however the Quintilla keeps an eight (8) syllable count per line while the Quintain has no such constraints. Also, the Quintain follows the rhyming form ABABB while the Quintilla can follow AABBA or ABBAA or ABAAB or ABABA.

I am not sure these are my best work as they sound quite limerick-ish and that wasn’t my intent, but I had to write something! At least I didn’t start it with “There once was a mom from South Philly…”

©️ iido 2018

Giant – A haiku

Comparatively

I am just a clump of dirt

You should be in charge

I am back on the streak with Patrick Jennings’ Pic and a Word Prompt #158 – Giant. These giant trees can be found on one of my favorite routes to run in my area. The path is paved and stroller friendly. At the bottom is a pond and at the top is a playground for a quick break before turning back around. The trail is a gradual uphill for 1.5 miles – going up can be brutal but you can fly going down.

As a mother, I loved Patrick’s short story – what mother doesn’t think her child should rule the world? But it also made me think about HOW I would want my child to rule – by believing that everything in the world is there to “serve” him, for her to plunder and use without regard? Or by instilling in my children that they need to care for our earth and the animals and people living on it? Is it fair that we puny humans are in charge of such grandeur when we are like toddlers playing with a new toy and then discarding it when we are bored or destroying it without even thinking about our actions? Most times, I think it’s not.

©️ iido 2018

Night’s Whispers – A Cascade Poem

My child cries “Mommy”

My lover sighs “Honey”

Night’s whispers change but the meaning is the same

For a drink or for potty

For snuggles or a story

My child cries “Mommy”

For a drink or movie

For snuggles or nookie

My lover sighs “Honey”

Darkness calls fear by different names

Speaks secrets and screams, depending on the game

Night’s whispers change but the meaning is the same

The Tuesday Writing Prompt at the Go Dog Go Cafe was to use the phrase “Night’s whispers” in a poem of any kind.

In my first drafts, I was using the phrase “night whispers”, but then I realized the prompt was for “night’s whispers”, that is “whispers belonging to the night”. A few tweaks and with the help of the cascade poem form, and this poem came to be.

This poem is probably the “time opposite” of my previous poem, “No Chocolate for Breakfast“. If you read both, you’ll get a sense of my life right now – day and night! If there was a prompt for “audience in the bathroom” or “all that schooling and all I do is taxi my kids around”, you’ll have the complete picture! Conversely, any prompts for “what’s something you do for yourself besides writing (or running)” or “what do you do when you have a free hour to yourself besides writing (or running)” would draw a blank!

©️ iido 2018

No Chocolate for Breakfast – A Quadrille

I witness it’s beginning

Eyes squinting

Lips frowning

Body quivering

Then the giant deluge of emotions burst from your body

It’s too early for you to understand

It’s too early for me to explain

So I hold you while we both dissolve into tears

Kim at dVerse Poets requested quadrilles (poems with exactly 44 words) using the word “early”. Here is my submission.

©️ iido 2018