Night Sounds – A Quadrille

The whisper of dry leaves

Parting to accommodate the stretching 

Of things growing taller, wider.

The frantic drumming of little hearts

Creating eddies of air

With delicately powerful moonlit wings

Which is louder in the still of the night

When no one is listening?

Image credit- Pixabay
(For visually challenged reader, the image shows a woodland scene, where blue butterflies are sitting on the forest floor among tiny mushrooms. Tall trees are visible in the background)

Two inspirations combined this week for the quadrille above. Mish at dVerse is the host for Quadrille #106 – Drum and Sadje’s “What do you see?” photo challenge #34 provided the photo above.

I loved the peaceful beauty of this photo – exactly what I needed to see with all the turmoil in the world. I could imagine the quiet breath of fluttering wings, the hush of the forest. The human photographer must have waited long time, in silence, in order to catch this photo and not disturb the wonder of nature.

Humans disturb nature in so many ways. Reading the essays in The BeZine made me realize the tremendous impact of human behavior, human self-interest and – dare I say it? – human selfishness, on the destruction of our natural world, the destruction of our brothers and sisters, and ultimately, our own destruction.

There is a saying that I’m sure you’ve seen on nature trails, “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” But what if even our footprints destroy the very things that brought us to the nature trail to begin with? We would be able to take those pictures, but the people coming after us would not. Would getting these pictures be worth that destruction?

©️ 2020 iido

Mother With the Green Hair – A Poem

Rough brown skin scratches my cheek

I lean into your strength

My arms wrap around you

My fingers not touching

Reminding me of your age

A comfort in this short sighted world

Your willowy boughs sway in the hot breeze

But under your protective shadow

I am but one who rejoices/relishes in your giving nature.

This poem was written for Jamie Dedes’ Wednesday Writing Prompt to write a poem about a time when I felt most at one with nature (note: the link is Jamie’s post with the prompt responses as she has a new method for collecting response to her prompts. The original request is here.)

I love Nature however Nature has often times not loved me back as evidenced by all the insect bites I usually get during the summer, the sunburns, and the humid-inspired frizzy hair-do. Trees though have been a stalwart friend on these hot summer days. I am always saddened when I see one being cut down. All those decades, centuries of growing…and only a few minutes to have it all fall down. Not to mention the loss of an oxygen creator…

When we lived in verdant New Hampshire, Hubby and I used to joke about not having enough trees for everyone…now I fear, that may soon be not a joking matter.

©️ iido 2019

Seeing Red – A Lai Poem

The last precious one
My final task done
Red rose
Above pollution
Away from poison
It grows
It’s a red beacon
In this world, barren
Sorrows

My steps are heavy
There’s pain in my knee
But still
I climb this aerie
To set my mind free
Fulfill
A promise, a plea
Keep on – hopefully
Until…

No one comes after
It’s such a bother
To care
There is no anger
It’s just whatever
I dare
Say that forever
Gone this red flower
No spare

Another Lai Poem — are you guys tired of this form? Not yet for me! The rhythm and rhymes challenge and intrigue me – it’s like a haiku but “extra” (at least in my humble opinion).

This Lai Poem incorporates Patrick’s Pic and a Word Challenge #187- Red and serendipitously, Hélène’s What do you see? photo prompt picturing a red flower (I’m calling it a rose) atop a high tower.. This image of an older woman precarious climbing this enormous tower reminded me of the Herculean task (or is it Sisyphean?) of climate change activists today and even for people like me (and hopefully you!) trying to do our part to protect our earth.

©️ iido 2019

Prelude to Destruction – A Haibun

Bach’s Prelude in C Major is a well-known piano piece that is about two minutes long. Close your eyes while you listen to it and imagine a stream gently flowing over rocks as it meanders through green forest. Now imagine 130,000 barrels of oil being dumped in that stream. What will happen to the forest and the critters living there?

Now picture the wind whispering over a meadow blanketed with flowers still bright with color despite the new moon. And now a bulldozer comes to move 5000 tons of garbage onto the meadow including plastic that will take a millennia to decompose. How do the colors and aroma of landfill compete with that of wildflowers?

Or listen to the music and let your mind wander over the ocean, the warm sun highlighting the majesty of humpback whales breaching the surface. Now heat trapped by greenhouses causes 600,000 tons of ice to melt in Antarctica raising temperatures that could kill 400 plant and animal species in a year. Would seeing the dead carcasses of whales and other see creatures be as majestic?

Two minutes, the length of a prelude whose repetitious melody can remind us of the repeated wastefulness and mindless consumption we daily engage in that will lead to the destruction of this planet we call home.

Two minutes to kill

The only world that we know

Time to change the song

This (very loosely defined) Haibun was written for Jamie’s first Wednesday Writing Prompt of 2019 focused on the theme of the environment. I also included the last Tuesday Writing Prompt from Devereaux and Beth Amanda at the Go Dog Go Cafe. Their request was to include the words new moon, minutes and prelude in a poem. It definitely took me more than 10-15 minutes to write this Haibun!

The facts embedded in this poem come from this article about things that happen around the world in a minute. I doubled the numbers to match the two minutes of the prelude (I hope I did the math correct!). Conservation and protection of our environment is a cause my family and I are passionate about. We recycle and are trying to compost. We limit our plastic use – the kids have even given up straws! Just two minutes of a small change to your daily habits can make a difference! You can save the world with reusable bags as your cape!

©️ iido 2019